Four seasons

We have four seasons in Finland, which are winter, spring, summer and autumn. For no reason, let’s start with spring. Spring is just a period when people are waiting for summer. In fact, Finns has this old proverb predicts the arrival of migratory birds as how close the summer is already. But there are also some more reliable things where you can notice that summer is coming. The nature becomes greener and you start to notice a little smile on people’s face. The weather is very varied in that time. Someday it’s 10 degrees and sun is shining and the next day it’s -5 degrees and winter has come back.

 

 

 

Oh summer! I think without the summer there wouldn’t even be Finnishness or at least it would be a way sadder concept. Because summer is the time when Finnish people can enjoy the thousand lakes and long holidays that we have. In fact, I believe that Finland is the only country in the world that has this one month when everything stops. Because in July almost everybody has their summer vacations. And our summer is too short so we must enjoy every second of it. Usually people spend time in their summer cottages and just enjoy the warm weather.

 

After summer comes a long cold and rainy autumn. That’s the time when Finnish people are spending a lot of time indoors reading books for example. And yes, autumn is also noticeable on people’s face. If you see a smiling Finn in a rainy autumn day, you should take picture of it. But when you see the fall colors, autumn isn’t that bad anymore.

 

The early winter isn’t so nice because there’s this slush time. But when the snow stays in the ground, winter starts officially. And then is time for winter sports. Skating, cross country and downhill skiing. In sunny winter day, people like also take long walks on the ice or in the woods. Usually they have packed lunch and hot chocolate in backpacks. There’s also this thing called hole in the ice. First you warm up in the sauna and then you dip or swim in freezing water and repeat it several times. Yeah crazy Finns.

 

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