Tag Archives: Finland

Finnish holidays

Each country has its own holidays, as well as Finland. Around the year Finns spend a variety of celebrations, some are known around the world, but some are Finns own story. Like everyone probably knows, Finland is located in north where the sun does not rise at all during the winter. Umh, and the winter lasts almost nine months in Finland… or at least the dark and cold time.

Fortunately, Finns have these holidays that cheer up in the middle of darkness and coldness. Okay, luckily we have also a three-month summer when the sun does not drop even at the night.

New Year’s Day

The very first holiday at the year is New Year’s Day. (First of January) The day, when everyone is tired of yesterdays celebrating and fireworks shooting. It’s also a day, when New Year’s promises keeping starts. Someones promises to save money, someones promises to start a diet. And very traditional Finn New Year’s promise is ”tipaton tammikuu”, it means that no alcohol in January. Good start for a good year!

Kuvahaun tulos haulle new year promise

Valentine’s Day

Valentine’s Day celebrating hasn’t been very common in Finland expect for the last few years. But Valentine’s Day has become more commercial day, because Valentine’s Day gifts are bought every year more and more. In Finland, a day is usually celebrated with our friends or partner at the movies or eating. Sending Valentine’s Day cards is also common.

 

 

Kuvahaun tulos haulle valentine's day

 

 

EasterKuvahaun tulos haulle virpojatEaster is a quite big holiday in Finland in spring. Finns are not very religious nation, so celebrating is more for children. Traditional Finn Easter manner is wish another person health and happiness on Palm Sunday by tapping them lightly with a willow twig and chanting a rhyme. It’s usually done by children in quest for candy. A willow twig is decorated with colorful feathers and children are also dressed like witches or Easter bunnies. Traditional Easter food is lamb and Finnish Easter pudding, which is made of rye.

Kuvahaun tulos haulle pääsiäisruoka

 

First of MayKuvahaun tulos haulle vappuFirst of May is common westerner holiday and in Finland carnerval for a workpeople and students. Usually celebrating happens in the cities downtown and everyone is wearing their graduation caps. Traditional drinks are mead, sparkling wines and shampagne. Funnel cake is also very own Finnish thing. Families with children are usually celebrating a day in carnivals and circus where balloons is a big thing.Kuvahaun tulos haulle vappu toriKuvahaun tulos haulle tippaleipä

Midsummer

Midsummer means fest of light and midsummer. Then sun doesn’t drop at all in Northern Finland. Midsummer sauna with bath whisk made of birch, bonfire and midsummer dances are very traditional manner in Finland. Almost everybody is celebrating it at their own summerhouse with family or friends. Unfortunately, drinking alcohol is always been part of Finns celebrating. Midsummer fest have also very old magic tricks and belifies. If you roll on grainfield at the morning dew, you can see in your dreams your future husband. It is also believed that drinking alcohol drives out evil spirits, and the harvest will be the better the more you drink.Kuvahaun tulos haulle juhannusHalloween

Celebrating Halloween hasn’t been very common in Finland, expect the last few years. It’s been more like remembering departed people. The most important symbol is grinning pumpkin. Departed people, ghosts, vampires, witches and black cats are also favourite symbols. Children usually wear ghost or other costumes and go door to door asking trick or treat.Kuvahaun tulos haulle karkki vai kepponenIndependent Day

Finland’s Independence Day is very important and big day for all Finns. Finland celebrates it’s 100th anniversary on 2017. Independence is still important to the Finns and touches us because we lost more than 60 000 soldiers, most of them was young men aged 20.Kuvahaun tulos haulle itsenäisyyspäiväTraditional Independence Day program include watching movie ”Tuntematon Sotilas” (”The Unknown Soldier”), that tells of the Finnish war against the Soviet Union from 1941 to 1945.

In the evening, the Presidential Independence Day reception is shown on the TV. There is invited almost 2000 guest in every year. Usually people admire the guests gowns and always vote for the ”Castle Balls” queen and king.Kuvahaun tulos haulle linnan juhlat

 

 

 

 

 

Christmas Eve and Day and Boxing Day

Kuvahaun tulos haulle suomalainen joulu

Christmas is the most biggest holiday in Finland. There is so much tradition manners and foods. On Christmas Eve usually families gather together and eat Christmas food. Christmas table’s king is absolutely ham! Also rosolli salad, rutabaga casserole, potato casserole, carrot casserole and salmon is very common. In the evening Santa Claus from Korvatunturi will visit and share gifts for children. Christmas carols, cards, costumes, get together and visiting in cemetery are traditional manners in Finland.Kuvahaun tulos haulle suomalainen joulupöytä

 

 

New Years Eve

Kuvahaun tulos haulle fireworks helsinki

New Year’s Eve is a last day in a whole year. A day when Finns celebrate spended year. Shooting fireworks and pouring of tin in to water is traditional manner in Finland. Melted tin sets fast and the shape of tin tells you a lot of what is coming on next year. Maybe it’s a coin which means a lot of money or maybe it’s a heart and you will find a love. No one knows…

Kuvahaun tulos haulle tinan valaminen

 

Finnish nature

The first thing that comes to my mind when I think about Finland is the beautiful nature we have. In Finland we have all four seasons summer, autumn, winter and spring. Summers aren’t that warm here in Finland. During the summer Finns visit their summer cottages, barbeques and enjoy life. In Finland we have so called “yötön yö” which means that sun doesn’t set at all.

Autumn is very beautiful in Finland. Trees turn to red and yellow. It is time to go mushrooming and picking up apples. Autumn is also perfect time to go hikinng.

In Finland we get lots of snow during the winter (at least in the north). Winter is cold and dark. In wintertime we have so called “kaamos” which means that sun doesn’t rise at all. It is the opposite to the “yötön yö” that we have in the summer. We have a lot of winter activities such as skiing, ice-hockey, snowboarding and etc. One very Finnish thing to do in the winter is to go swimming into the frozen lake/river. Finns drill hole into the ice and dips in. It is common to go to sauna to warm up afterwards.

When the spring comes people are very happy, because cold and dark winter is behind us and the summer is coming!

The Wonderland

Finland, the Wonderland

Finland is a country where the most beautiful people live. It is also a country of high education and equality. Finns are known of their honesty, loyalty and shyness. They say that if you make friends with a Finn, it lasts for a lifetime. These are well known facts, but what else is Finland?

Finland is also a lot more. Finland is an amazing Wonderland. People living and visiting in this Wonderland can enjoy the pureness of the nature and the characters found only there.

Amazing characters of the Wonderland

Joulupukki, Santa Clause

Up north in Korvatunturi, Rovaniemi, you can meet the one and only Santa Claus all year round. Santa Claus lives there and you can meet him personally. Children and why not adults, can visit Santa Claus and give their wish list for Christmas. It is a magical place where all the childhood dreams can come true!

Muumit, Moomins

But wait, what are those white little creatures? They must be the Moomins. You can’t miss Moomins if you visit Finland. They are all around. These loved characters you can meet for real in Naantali, where is the Moomin World. There is also a museum in Tampere for Moomins.

Angry Birds

Have you ever met an Angry Bird? Finns have created this worldwide known game for everyone to enjoy. We also have theme parks to get the real experience. You can imagine yourself inside of the game and survive from one obstacle to another. The best part is that there are many theme parks around Finland. You can just choose easily where to step into that Angry Bird adventure.

Breathtaking nature of the Wonderland

Okay we have the amazing characters all around Finland. But that alone doesn’t make Finland a real Wonderland yet. Finnish nature is something amazing. Just a right place to live if you are a magical character like the ones above. Finland’s four seasons takes breath away. Spring is the time when the nature starts to gloom after long winter. Summer will please you with flowers, endless amount of lakes, berries and animals. Autumn will amaze you with a great wide of colors. Winter has a secret source of light, and it is the Northern Lights. Finns secret weapon against dark winter. Northern Lights are mysterious, because they appear many times during winter, but you might miss them if you want to see them too much.

Being a Finn

Being a Finn, I am proud and thankful of this Wonderland. There is nothing better than to visit Santa Claus during Christmas time and see the magical Northern Lights at the same trip. Or enjoy summertime with a book of Moomins adventures while birds are singing and blueberries waiting for me to eat them.

Finnish Seasons

Finland is land of beautiful forest and clean waters. Finns love to go to their cottages during their summer break and many of us enjoy our beautiful nature.

Henkilön Helena Kapanen kuva.

In Finland we have four different seasons, spring, summer, autumn, and winter. Every of those seasons have their own effects to Finns, we are like two different people during summer, when there hardly is dark nights at all, and during winter when it is always dark.

When it is summer, Finns go to concerts and festivals, we will have good time and drink beer. Summer is the time for living, it is the time for joy!

Henkilön Helena Kapanen kuva.

When autumn comes, it is time to go to the forest and collect mushrooms and berries, Finland’s forest offers best and most healthy treats there can be.

Henkilön Helena Kapanen kuva.

During winter you should put on your woolen socks, it is common that Finns have even made them themselves from Novita’s yarn. Those self-made socks will chase away depression of the cold and dark winter.

Henkilön Helena Kapanen kuva.

And when the spring comes, it is time to go out again to see the sun.

 

My Experiences of Finnishness

For me, being Finnish means berry-picking trips in the middle of North-Karelian mosquito-filled woods in my grandmother’s century-old jacket, and afterwards, the scent of a freshly baked blueberry pie. Being Finnish is filling a crossword puzzle in the morning at our summer cottage’s patio with a blanket wrapped around my shoulders. It is celebrating the mid summer and watching a flaming bonfire. Being Finnish is  sensing the crisp, cold Nordic air in the wintertime (meaning freezing your butt off), waiting for a bus, which is always late from schedule due to heavy snow.

When I think about the Finnish way of life, I just imagine an all-round basic and simple everyday life. For me, being Finnish is not about being beautiful and polished, it is being pure, bare and honest, which I love. We as whole don’t crave for spectacles, we strive from tradition and harmonic life of honest labor and steady, safe family lives. The stereotypical Finn works a 9 to 5 job for the  most of the year, escapes to his summer cottage for the summer, and returns to the workplace with a messy hair and an uneven summer tan. Steady, safe and familiar, routine-filled life is what I grew up with, and what I respect.

One of my favorite things about Finland is the nature. We have such a beautiful nature surrounding us, which we often seem to take for granted. Although the summer may be wet and cloudy some times, the beautiful view of a lake landscape or the green forests is without a doubt humbling. When other countries may suffer from drought or overpopulation, our small country is full of nature, space, and places to explore. The wintertime is so beautiful, when every place is packed with fresh, white, untouched snow.

Only recently have I woken up to the fact that I love being a normal Finn. I’m glad we have free education, good healthcare and a broad knowledge of different things. Whether I’m staying at home or exploring the town, I feel safe and not afraid. I grew up knowing that I can trust others, and do what I wish. We have freedom of speech and equality.

Being Finnish is knowing the lyrics or the evergreen iskelmä-songs. Being Finnish is stuffing ketchup in every single meal, no matter if the flavor serves any meaning to the food itself.  Being Finnish is dark humor, sarcasm and bad puns. Being Finnish is coffee, Fazer-chocolate, rye bread and sausage. Being Finnish is being Me! 🙂

Nature sets the mindset

Finland – the land of thousand lakes, lush green nature and shy people who are hard to get to know and go to sauna a lot. As a Finn, I’ve heard this a gazillion times and as all of those notions are true, there is more to us Finns than meets the eye.

As there are so many forests and lakes, it is natural (pun intended) that our culture has become so closely entwined with it – in the past as provider of food and shelter and today as a sanctuary where people can rest and forget the hectic outside world. The feeling you get from watching the sun set behind a lake, seeing the Northern Lights dance upon a frosty winter sky or just gazing at the stars in dark autumn night is just indescribable and it has had a profound effect in us.

There are even studies about how walking in a forest will lower your blood pressure in 20 minutes and I believe that we Finns have known this all along, nature gives us peace of mind and we just want to enjoy it. That background added with the traditional Finnish logic of if you don’t have anything meaningful to say, it is better to be quiet and say nothing at all. That can easily show differently on the outside and is at least partly the reason why Finns are so unfamiliar with small talk.

I remember reading an article about which European citizens travel the most and was really surprised to find Finns in the top 3. The article explained that Finns don’t travel abroad that much but the reason that put them in top places of list was, of course, summer cottages. And there was a staggering number of 502 900 of them in 2016. So that’s where we are, not talking and going to saunas most of the time.

My theory is that the nature has shaped us into who we are and how we see the world and personally, I couldn’t be happier.

 

Nature in Southern Finland

Finland is well known for a beautiful nature. There are many places where you should go and see. Lapland is of course one of the best-known places in Northern Finland. There are also amazing places in Southern Finland which are not that well known.

Now I tell you about one place in the Southern Finland which is called Kiikunlähde. Nature Spring is located in Hollola, Finland. Spring is 400 meters long and 100 meters wide. The water is so blue and bright that you can see the bottom of the Spring. I visited there last summer with my friend and I think it was worth it. For example, you can make a road trip with your friends in the summer and visit there during that trip.                                                                                 Kiikunlähde
There is also lots of other places where you can add to your road trip. Repovesi National Park is located in Kouvola, Finland and it’s not far away from Kiikunlähde. Nuuksio National Park is located in Helsinki metropolitan area. Both of those places are full of activities so you don’t get bored. You can hike, canoe or bicycle all day long. I think National Parks is good way to see the Finnish nature.                                                                     Necessary tourist picture

Finnishness for me

Finnish mentality

Finnish mentality has been molded by the harsh nature, scarce population and the wars where we have been in the middle. Finnish people are in general more silent and extreverted compared to our southern neighbors. We have strong sense of whats right and whats wrong, we are honest but very considerate, which can lead to some problems with foreign people.

Nature

https://www.pandotrip.com/wp-content/uploads/2014/12/Oulanka2-740x518.jpg

Nature has always been a major part in the Finnish lifestyle. Not many generations ago most people lived outside of cities. I feel as though the lives have changed in these few generations, we are still very close to the nature in general compared to larger countries.

Safety

One of the cornerstones of Finland is safety. The phenomenon where parents can’t let their kids play outside after dark because of fear is not a thing in Finland. Although we do have rather high homicide rates compared to other Nordic countries, the chances of random acts of violence are very low. This safety is rare in todays world, and we should cherish it.

My home in Finland – where my story began

For me being a Finn is a weird concept. I can’t seem to relate to most of the stereotypes of Finnish people on a personal level. I am social and outgoing, I don’t mind people entering my personal space (if I know them), I am very affectionate and I am loud and giggly and I actually don’t like sauna that much. The stereotype of grumpy Finns who prefer to grunt in response and avoid interaction with other people whenever possible doesn’t seem to suit me. But I am still a Finn and it means other things to me as it is different for everyone. I guess belonging somewhere comes from yourself and what you believe it means and requires. In a way I am a Finn because I was born in Finland and lived here most of my life. But my times abroad and meeting international people have changed me as well as a person. So it’s not just about where you come from, it’s about who you are and want to be.

But enough of that philosophical blabbering, let’s get down to the things that I think make me a Finn.

Nature

Whether it is camping outside and gazing at the stars while roasting marshmallows or sausages on a campfire or skinny dipping in a lake and running back into a sauna on a clear summer night, nature has always been close to me. I grew up in the country side so I got to experience it on a whole new level. There’s nothing more calming to going into the forest on a clear snow day and just listening to the sound of nature while admiring the view that unfolds before you. Snowy landscape is one of my favorite sights to see and it holds the candle to the other wonders of the world. This part of Finnishness also holds the sports we get to do during winter time. Ice skating, skiing, sliding down the hill on a sleigh, all of these and many more would not be possible in many other places.

Food and drinks

There are quite many foods that you wouldn’t come across elsewhere or there might be something similar. I know these names won’t mean much to you but for example karjalanpiirakka, piparkakku, karjalanpaisti, mämmi (which is disgusting by the way) or salted liquorices. We Finns do love our salted liquorice, we put it into almost anything; ice cream, chocolate, alcohol etc. Salmari, the alcoholic drink, is good by the way. Which brings us to the drinking culture in Finland. In a lot of countries drinking is a social thing where as in Finland we can also just do “kalsarikännit” which basically means getting drunk in our underwear alone at home. That’s another thing we do, we get drunk. Sometimes might enjoy a glass or two when having food or going to sauna but if we go out we go all out. During the weekend around 4 am you can find Finns queuing up to a pizzeria or some snack kiosk with greasy food to get something to fill their alcohol infused bellies. And that’s when we actually talk to strangers even if they wouldn’t want you to.

 

Language

I can’t even count how many times I’ve enjoyed listening to foreigners trying to speak Finnish. I really appreciate the effort though and I congratulate you for trying since it’s definitely not the easiest language. Even Finns have trouble understanding each other depending which part of the country they come from. To many Finnish just sounds like a really long word since we do not tend to breathe in between while talking. We take a deep breath and let it all out in one go. No wonder we don’t talk much. If we don’t have anything to say why say anything at all. Words hold quite a lot of power and verbal agreements can be almost as binding as written ones. If you make a promise you are excepted to hold true to your words. But Finnish language can be quite funny once you learn it (if you learn it).

So I would proudly say, yes I am a Finn. But I am also me and that is so much more.

Finnishness for me

When I think about Finnishness the first things that comes to my mind are coffee, lakes, beautiful landscapes, shyness, sauna and four seasons. I love the Finnish summer (when it is warm…).
Beautiful landscapes

I like to go jogging just to see new beautiful landscapes. I have always lived neat by the lake. It is so beautiful when you go for a walk just before the sun sets. Below you can see few of my favorite pictures. The views are beautiful in every season.

Sauna

Finns like to go to sauna. It’s totally normal that everyone is naked in sauna. It seems funny because Finns are quite shy but in sauna you can be naked with strangers. The best thing in the summer is to go to a cottage and just hang out there with your friends and go to sauna and swim in the lake.

There are over three million saunas in Finland. That is more than we have cars. Many Finnish have tradition to go to sauna at least once a week. When I was a kid we went to sauna every Saturday and after that watched a movie.

Four seasons

There are four seasons in Finland. All of the seasons are very different. Summer is my favorite. In the summer, there are also at night very bright. In Lapland, there is a day when the sun doesn’t set at all. At winter, I like to go downhill skiing. At autumn, it is very beautiful when the leaves are red and yellow.